Erin

A topographic map of [[Ireland]], after which Erin is named Erin is a Hiberno-English word for Ireland originating from the Irish word ''"Éirinn"''. "Éirinn" is the dative case of the Irish word for Ireland, "Éire", genitive "Éireann", the dative being used in prepositional phrases such as ''"go hÉirinn"'' "to Ireland", ''"in Éirinn"'' "in Ireland", ''"ó Éirinn''" "from Ireland".

The dative has replaced the nominative in a few regional Irish dialects (particularly Galway-Connemara and Waterford). Poets and nineteenth-century Irish nationalists used ''Erin'' in English as a romantic name for Ireland. Often, "Erin's Isle" was used. In this context, along with Hibernia, Erin is the name given to the female personification of Ireland, but the name was rarely used as a given name, probably because no saints, queens, or literary figures were ever called Erin.

According to Irish mythology and folklore, the name was originally given to the island by the Milesians after the goddess ''Ériu''.

The phrase Erin go bragh ("Éire go brách" in standard orthography, dative "in Éirinn go brách" "in Ireland forever"), a slogan associated with the United Irishmen Rebellion of 1798, is often translated as "Ireland forever". Provided by Wikipedia
1
by Erin
Published 2008
2
by Erin
Published 2008
3
by Erin
Published 2007
4
by Erin
Published 2007
5
by Erin
Published 2008
6
by Hunter, Erin
Published 2005
7
by Downing, Erin
Published 2009
8
by Nicholas, Erin
Published 2016
9
by Hunter, Erin
Published 2008
10
by Kelly, Erin
Published 2011
11
12
by Downing, Erin
Published 2009
13
by Hunter, Erin
Published 2004
14
by Erin Zehana
Published 2009
15
by Hunter, Erin
Published 2009
16
by Hunter, Erin
Published 2005
17
by Gruwell, Erin
Published 2007
18
by Hunter, Erin
Published 2009
19
by Watt, Erin
Published 2016
20
by Kelly, Erin
Published 2011